Site-Reading Writing Quarterly

Reader’s Biography

I am a thinker and practitioner of what is increasingly called artistic research. For years, my work and my life were divided between artistic practice and critical thought. I therefore arrive to this growing field with a strong sensation of pressure directed to generating new forms. As an editor, I do my best to support the development of such forms, while as a practitioner I am relentlessly critical of them. I dislike writing reviews, because I prefer to examine works for the contributions they make and leave critique to wider discussions. But I am grateful for this opportunity to exchange.

Reader’s Biography

Emma Cocker is a disorderly reader – with piles of books in different locations, where reading unfolds through the movement between: in the shifts and slippages from one book to another; in the chance encounter between the lines, in the gaps and intervals, the moments of pause. On her table, now. Radical Attention. The Inner Touch. The Five Senses. Being Given. Matters of Care. The Disappearance of Rituals. The Ecology of Attention. Slow Philosophy. Living Thinking. Correspondences. Ethics. Power of Gentleness. Thinking in the World. In Praise of Risk. How to Land. Ethical Know-How. Letting Go. Syncope. On Becoming Aware. Aesthetics, Art, Life.

Issue 7

Reader’s Biography

I read the newsfeed on my phone and sometimes the paper, and e-mails – a lot. I think about novels that I want to read and then don’t read them; I read my students’ writing, my own writing and re-write. I am reading a huge catalogue titled Critical Zones: The Science and Art of Landing on Earth edited by Bruno Latour and Pieter Weibel, and a pair of very small books - Kathryn Yusoff’s A Billion Black Anthropocenes or None, and Ursula K LeGuin’s The Carrier Bag Theory of Fiction with an introduction by Donna Haraway. I am reading to my son out loud at bedtime – Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. 

Reader’s Biography

Paulette Singley shuttles back and forth between teaching architectural history-theory classes and building design studios. This dual vocation allows her to read texts as potential inspiration for studio projects and to develop writing and research as indispensable tools for studio work. This also accounts for the wide-ranging subject matter she has covered in her publication history, from Fascist Rome to architectural dollhouses, all produced through a feminist lens. For the spring of 2021 she is reading the foodscape of Rome, Italy as a recipient of the Adele Chatfield-Taylor Rome Prize at the American Academy in Rome.  On the desk in front of her the following books have been consumed voraciously: Karima Moyer-Nocchi and Giancarlo Rolandi’s The Eternal Table: A Cultural history of Food in Rome, Oretta Zanini de Vita’s Popes, Peasants and Shepherds: Recipes and Lore from Rome to Lazio, Fabio Parasecoli’s Al Dente: A History of Food in Italy, Katie Parla and Kristina Gill’s Tasting Rome: Fresh Flavors and Forgotten Recipes from an Ancient City, and June di Schino’s Arte Dolciaria Barocca: I Segreti del Credenziere di Alessandri VII.

Issue 6

Readers’ Biographies

We are at our happiest eating the dirt of place.

Reader’s Biography

Tim Cresswell was a reader before he was a writer. When in an art gallery, he reads all the text before he looks at the art. He misses double fold album covers with all the lyrics printed inside. When he says a restaurant has a good menu – he actually means the menu. Tim tries to carry his logocentrism lightly. When at home, he can be found reading all kinds of hybrid poetry/geography/cultural theory texts including books by Maggie Nelson, Claudia Rankine, Susan Howe and Anna Tsing.  This year he was particularly struck by Richard Powers’ novel, Overstory. 


Reader's Biography

I don’t read much fiction, but am captivated by the creative writing practices of feminist artists and theorists seeking to know and live differently with/in the world. For me, this is pleasure-reading; the work is smart, the arguments compelling, and the ideas life-changing. It is a reading that connects thinking with feeling. It can be elemental and tropic, like drawing breath or turning toward the light. Or it may be immersive and fluid, like being swept along a meandering river or drifting out to sea with a changing tide. For this reader, reading matters, reading makes sense.

~

Reader's Biography

I have never known what to say ‘I am’ in disciplinary terms, any more than in my life. Professor Emerita at The Slade School of Fine Art, UCL, yes, an interdisciplinary (undisciplined) maker, digital language artist, poet, filmmaker, yes, (but not ‘professional’), feminist, yes, profoundly, though I distrust ‘isms’. Everything I make or write concerns multivalency and how this works to shift boundaries and recalibrate meanings: to enable innovation. Supervising over 25 practice-based, transdisciplinary PhDs on cultural practices is a highlight of my academic work precisely because it is defined by innovation. 

~


Readers' Biographies

Caroline Rabourdin is a slow and avid reader, an artists’ books collector. She utterly enjoys the materiality of language, lingering on the spoken as much as the printed word. She listens carefully to the words of multilingual poet Caroline Bergvall, is inspired by the essay form and the writing in becoming of Montaigne, Jacques Derrida, Hélène Cixous and Mireille Calle-Gruber, intrigued by the linguistic gymnastics of Louis Wolfson, informed by the acuity of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, and captivated by Michel Butor’s work on space and collaboration with artists. She recently bought her first book in German, by architect Arakawa and artist Madeline Gins. carolinerabourdin.com Matthew Chrislip reads from a satellite position. That is to say, he reads to relay, to translate, and to triangulate. Most recently he’s been reading (in English) twentieth-century sci-fi classics and (in French) contemporary gay autofiction and (in academia) about simultaneous interpretation. dowland.us

~

Readers' Biographies

Marko Jobst is a writer and researcher based in the UK. He has practiced architecture in Belgrade and London and taught at a number of London schools of architecture. He is currently reading Jack Halberstam’s The Queer Art of Failure and Garth Greenwell’s Cleanness, and hoping that rereading his own writing after lockdown won’t make him despair. Hélène Frichot is Professor of Architecture and Philosophy and Director of the Bachelor of Design, Faculty of Architecture, Building and Planning, University of Melbourne, Australia, and Guest Professor in Critical Studies in Architecture, Stockholm, Sweden. While she has A. N. Whitehead’s Adventures in Ideas and Isabelle Stengers’ Thinking with Whitehead propped in a pile of other books beside her bed (true story), she is mostly just watching TV series (based on true stories) during the current pandemic lockdown. Klaske Havik is Chair of Methods & Analysis at TU Delft’s Faculty of Architecture. She just finished reading (in Dutch translation) Laurent Binet’s novel La septième fonction du langage, a fictional ‘whodunnit’, which is centred around the death of Roland Barthes in Paris 1980, and offers a hilarious portrait of the French academic scene at the time, featuring such characters as Julia Kristeva, Michel Foucault and Louis Althusser. Catharina Gabrielsson is Docent in Architecture and Associate Professor in Urban Theory at the School of Architecture KTH, Stockholm. She is currently reading the collected writings of Marianne Höök (1918-1970) a Swedish socialist and feminist intellectual whose upper-class background and stylish looks prevented her from gaining full recognition for her critical thinking on politics and aesthetics.

~

Issue 3

Reader's Biography

For the last couple of years I (Mohamad Hafeda) have been reading texts around time and waiting, exploring the specificity of the temporal in situations of displacement, when spatial references are lost, denied or threatened. I have also been thinking of the temporality of art practices, participatory processes and forms of representation and what they could offer in responding to current struggles over space and time. Many of the writer-practitioners in The Creative Critic talk about the temporal dimension of both writing and reading; for example the associations made between (textual) materials that could be linear, simultaneous, disjointed ... More interestingly they explore care, listening, slowness and other attributes that are also temporal and offer alternative ethical practices.

~

Reader's Biography

In the last year, between us (and not always in agreement), we have read, sometimes re-read, and loved (in alphabetical order): Raymond Antrobus’ The Perseverance, Jessie Burton’s The Miniaturist, Ashon Crawley’s Blackpentecostal Breath, Jennifer Doyle’s Hold It Against Me, Lucy Ellmann’s Ducks, Newburyport, Ross Gay’s The Book of Delights , Laura Harris’s Experiments in Exile, Tove Jansson’s Moominland Midwinter, Ursula Le Guin’s Earthsea Cycle Series, Jennifer Nash’s Black Feminism Reimagined, Yoko Ono’s Grapefruit, Phillip Pullman’s The Secret Commonwealth, Sally Rooney’s Normal People, Ali Smith’s Spring, Phil Smith’s Guidebook for an Armchair Pilgrimage, and Elizabeth Strout’s My Name Is Lucy Barton.

~

Issue 2

Reader's Biography

For some reason when I grew up I never read The Earthsea Cycle by Ursula le Guin, where dragons and wizards (mages) abound. Now, a keen reader of Isabelle Stengers and Donna Haraway, who both touch on Le Guin, I have finally arrived at this reading, which I also attempt to introduce to my children (still working on that). Because of Stengers, I have been reading her collaborator Didier Debaise who offers close readings of A. N. Whitehead. This finally returns me to a long-term relationship with Gilles Deleuze, always there like a kindly grandfather in the background. Readings such as these lead me to emergent spaces and encounters between architectures and philosophies. I am at home in neither disciplinary domain.

~

Reader's Biography

I am an Untimely Academic Novella Writer, PhD and Associate Professor of Social Work, Linköping University, Sweden. During 2008-2017 I founded and led the international network for Reflexive Academic Writing Methodologies (RAW), a web-based network with a book corner and a stage for performances and interviews. I am a passionate reader of small format books and texts, such as the novella, the short story, poetry and theatre. Feminist literary fiction and postcolonial writings have shaped the tone and architecture of my work and given me courage to practice emergent writing methodologies. I often re-read books and my relationship to reading is both textual and visual.

~


Back to Top